»The Vibration of Things« or »On Interconnectedness«

Elke aus dem Moore, Director of Akademie Schloss Solitude, was invited to curate the 15th edition of the Fellbach Small Sculpture Triennial. The exhibition »The Vibration of Things« and the accompanying events focus on the »vibrations« of objects, their ownership and the topic of restitution, as well as the interconnectedness of all living beings, both with one another and their surroundings. Central to »The Vibration of Things« is the appreciation of nature and of different knowledge systems, particularly Indigenous cosmologies, as well as the presentation of multi-generational pieces. This year’s Triennial, which was on view till October 3, shows sculptural works by a diverse network of artists from different backgrounds, including members of the Akademie Schloss Solitude network.

Elke aus dem Moore in conversation with Sarie Nijboer — Okt 1, 2022

Akademie Schloss Solitude - »The Vibration of Things« or »On Interconnectedness«

Alte Kelter Fellbach, exhibition view 15. Trienniale Kleinplastik Fellbach, 2022. Photo: Peter D. Hartung

Sarie Nijboer: How was »The Vibration of Things« conceived of, and what approaches were important to you in developing the Triennial?

Elke aus dem Moore: In 2020, when I received the invitation to curate the 15th edition of the Fellbach Small Sculpture Triennial, some initial ideas struck me immediately. Some of the central artistic pieces within the Triennial, I call them the »ancestresses«, are deceased female artists whom I understand as points of reference: Annette Wehrmann with her footballs made of brick and cement, for instance, which one »stumbles upon« at the beginning of the exhibition. This constitutes a curated process of irritation, an invitation to assure oneself that not everything is as one thinks or expects. The footballs are heavy, impossible to move and difficult to play with.1

Akademie Schloss Solitude - »The Vibration of Things« or »On Interconnectedness«

Nijolė Šivickas, exhibition view 15. Trienniale Kleinplastik Fellbach, 2022. Photo: Peter D. Hartung

»The West has become rather constrained and isolated as a result of its one-dimensionality. As part of a planetary community, it is fundamentally important to reflect on and acknowledge different knowledge systems.«

As I always view my curatorial and institutional work in a specific context – be it local, international or institutional – and develop it on the basis of a collaborative idea, it rapidly became clear to me that I wanted to develop this triennial in conversation with three artists, namely Antje Majewski, Gabriel Rossell Santillán and Memory Biwa. I enjoy a long personal and professional history with these colleagues and friends. We started to map out the theme of the Triennial early on during regular conversations on Zoom.

Three thematic strands emerged relatively quickly, and kept coming up in our conversations. In our initial reflections, we quickly ascertained that objects possess a vibration or energetic charge that is created both by intention, and by the significance it holds for people.  One of the other key ideas that preoccupied us was the fundamental question of the ownership of living things: How do we, as humans, come to believe that we can own something which is alive, such as plants, humans and animals? Accordingly, we also examined the topic of restitution, or the question of what happens to objects that have migrated from a violent experience and have been violently placed in another context. The third narrative strand relates to the interconnectedness of all living beings in this world. This is a major theme that finds its reference in Indigenous cosmologies. Accordingly, the Triennial includes some pieces of indigenous art.

Sarie Nijboer:In your work at the Institute for Foreign Cultural Relations (ifa) as well as at Contemporary& or Akademie Schloss Solitude, you have always focused on this transcultural exchange and non-Western perspectives. What is so important to you about these issues?

Elke aus dem Moore: Western thinking is quite one-dimensional in its rational, or cognitive, character and disregards many different forms of knowledge production. The claimed dominance of this thinking, which began to deem itself universal during the Enlightenment, was often accompanied by a parallel claim to power and violence. The eradication of indigenous epistemes and concepts of knowledge was attempted. The West has become rather constrained and isolated as a result of its one-dimensionality. As part of a planetary community, it is fundamentally important to reflect on and acknowledge different knowledge systems.

Many of the »agreements« of so-called civilization that emerged in the Enlightenment period are still valid today. These »misunderstandings« must be recognized and named as such. As just one example, the right of human beings to own living things has no basis whatsoever. Economist Dr Irene Schöne calls it »pure fiction«. In the Triennial exhibition and events, as well as in the catalogue, we devote ourselves to the excavation and exploration of these »misunderstandings«.

Akademie Schloss Solitude - »The Vibration of Things« or »On Interconnectedness«

Gabriel Rossell Santillán with Lizza May David, Keiko Kimoto, Karen Michelsen Castańón, Luis Ortiz and Antonio Paucar, exhibition view 15. Triennial Kleinplastik Fellbach, 2022, Photo: Peter D. Hartung

Sarie Nijboer: How did the Akademie Schloss Solitude network help to discover artworks for the Triennial, complementing and enriching its theme »The Vibration of Things«?

Elke aus dem Moore: In the more than 30 years of its existence, Akademie Schloss Solitude has welcomed over 1,600 fellows, including individuals participating in our Web Residencies. I have had and continue to have wonderful encounters with artists and scientists and learn so much in the process. Almost a third of the artistic pieces in the Triennale comes from the Solitude network, many of these from the network of the Digital Solitude program.

Part of the exhibition takes place in a digital exhibition space. Many of the young artists do not understand small sculptures or sculptural work exclusively as an analog process with and on the material, but have, instead, now developed a wider understanding of sculptural plasticity and create sculptures with the help of algorithms and artificial intelligence.2

In the digital part of the Triennial, we show works by former fellows or guests of the Akademie, including those by Mitra Wakil and Fabian Hesse, Jan Nikolai Nelles, Nora Al-Badri, Mary Maggic, Tiare Ribeaux, Mohsen Hazrati and Nkhensani Mkhani. Some artistic works offer a fresh experiential value, empowering others to use sculpture in their own personal context. One example of this is the figure of Nkisi by Nkhensani Mkhari, which originates from the Bantu religion and which Mkhari uses digitally or as a 3D printed figure to use in an altered or »augmented reality«, where it is needed, e.g. to improve a negative situation. Additionally, a new generation of artists is beginning to incorporate aspects of »healing« into their work. Many young artists are aware that recent generations of humanity have damaged and partially destroyed planet Earth, and that these actions are based on colonial thinking. Their works do not remain immured in criticism and analysis, but offer new ideas and practical guidelines as a call to action.

Akademie Schloss Solitude - »The Vibration of Things« or »On Interconnectedness«

Mohsen Hazrati, exhibition view 15. Triennale Kleinplastik Fellbach, 2022. Photo: Peter D. Hartung

Sarie Nijboer: You also came across the artist Nijolé Šivickas via the Solitude Network…

Elke aus dem Moore: During their stay, fellows of Akademie Schloss Solitude are invited to present their working methods and contexts. In her presentation as a fellow of the Akademie, Maria Cecilia Reyes, a young scholar from Colombia, showed a film she had co-authored about Nijolé Šivickas, a Lithuanian-Colombian artist. My enthusiasm for this artistic position, with which I was previously unfamiliar, was so great that I resolved to present some of the sculptural works from the late artist’s extensive oeuvre at the Triennial together with Maria Cecilia. In the process, Maria Cecilia discovered that Nijolé had studied at the State Academy of Fine Arts Stuttgart in the late 1940s and lived in Fellbach. Her artistic works are now on display at the Fellbach Small Sculpture Triennial for their first ever showing in Germany. In a parallel exhibition at the Städtische Galerie Fellbach (municipal gallery), we also showed her drawings, other sculptures and the film about this fascinating artist.

Sarie Nijboer: This also emphasizes that works of art continue to have an effect after the death of their creator, or when the intention of the artist is passed on. I have also experienced this in pieces by Annette Wehrmann and Irma Hünerfauth.

Elke aus dem Moore: Yes, that’s correct. The »western« way of looking at form, composition, color and materiality are not the only parameters of art and its effect. We see a critical and holistic kind of engagement in the works of Gabriel Rossell Santillán, for instance, or in the section curated by Memory Biwa with Namibian and South African artists, where the theme is »soundings«, i.e. specifically what makes a sound, what vibrates, what oscillates in the space, what resonance is created?

Gabriel Rossell Santillán is interested in the transformation of cultural knowledge. He invited the Indigenous Mexican Wixárika shamans (Mara’akate), some of whom he has lived with for many years, to Berlin to survey items stored in the ethnological museum in Berlin-Dahlem and investigate their energetic status. It transpired that the majority of the items are »dead« and no longer have any energy. Some of the items were treated with arsenic as a preservative, and have been kept in archive boxes for many decades. Some of them are stored in wrong constellations, which is greatly disruptive to the coexistence, economy and ecology of the Wixárikas. Gabriel’s video in the Triennial addresses this situation, and the enduring resistance of museums to find a way of handling the items that respects and incorporates the knowledge and needs of the Indigenous communities.

Akademie Schloss Solitude - »The Vibration of Things« or »On Interconnectedness«

Nijolė Šivickas, exhibition view 15. Trienniale Kleinplastik Fellbach, 2022. Photo: Peter D. Hartung

Sarie Nijboer: In your introductory text for the catalogue, you write: »A new radical rethinking based on ancient knowledge is necessary, which takes nature as a starting point, which recognizes the living forces of matter and sees things as animate.«3In this way, Antje Majewski has made nature itself the exhibition site for the Triennial. She found an area of forest in Fellbach, where she set up a series of sculptures that have assumed the role of forest guardians. Visiting this section of the exhibition in the forest with all the visitors as part of the opening ceremony felt very special. It became very clear that there, we are merely guests.

Elke aus dem Moore: We are part of nature, it’s just important to recognize that. And so it seems only logical that part of the exhibition takes place in an area of woodland. The wooden sculptures act as guardian spirits for the forest, tasked with protecting it from human infringement. This area of forest will now no longer be accessible to humans for an entire century, something that Antje Majewski made a prerequisite of this particular installation. In her work Sculpture Forest Sanctuary, Antje Majewski invited other artists to show their sculptures in the forest and as duplicates in the Alte Kelter (Old Wine Press).

Sarie Nijboer: The exhibition also includes an empty room. The dominant position of this room ensures that it takes up a great deal of space. Why was this room featured in the exhibition?

Elke aus dem Moore: In the curatorial process, it was essential for me to offer visitors an empty space in the middle of the exhibition to give them space to sit with their own experiences and perspectives. Diane Hillebrand created the exhibition design with sustainability in mind, and took up the idea of resonance by placing chairs in the exhibition space for resting and pausing. Over the course of the Triennial, this empty space became the locus of very intensive conversations between the visitors.

Sarie Nijboer: The Triennial has initiated a conversation about the importance of our interaction with nature and other life forms. What future shifts would you like to see which would help to change these approaches and find new ways of interaction?

Elke aus dem Moore: »Transformation« was the central theme of the 30th anniversary of Akademie Schloss Solitude in 2020. In a lecture series of the same name, international philosophers, thinkers and artists were invited to reflect on key topics in this era of change. Today, the urgency of issues such as the need to scrutinize the legacy of colonialism and its structures, which still affect us today, is visible. Many fundamental assumptions and »misunderstandings« have been recognized as such, and can thus also be changed. The question of how we can re-establish a respectful relationship with nature and perceive ourselves as part of it remains a central one. And how can we build relationships, globally, institutionally and economically, based on trust and respect? Polarities must be reduced and counteracted, and new forms of togetherness developed. We are currently at a crossroads, an evolutionary step that invites us to no longer remain mired in dualities and separation. Hervé Yamguen shows this in his bronze sculptures on display at the Triennial, in which man, animal and plant are one. In »En des matins ensoleillés«, he gifted us a wonderful poem:

On sunny mornings

Sometimes
From the shelter of a tree
On sunny mornings
I beam
As my gaze falls upon
A yellow flower
Or on a pile of dead leaves

Sometimes
While walking in the forest
I come across a piece
Of wood worn by time
And I humbly place my hands
On the rough surface
I feel the result of years
On the shape of the wood
And thus the wood speaks to me
My hands respond
Sometimes

In the midst of a pile of concrete
And scrap
And cigarette butts
And plastic waste
Taking up space
And rendering the sky grey
The houses covered in
Layers of dust
And cars’ exhaust smoke
Grow old with time

Sometimes
In the yard of a house
A sun’s ray lands
On a stone or on children’s toys
And the truth becomes tangible
A nail finds its way in fabric
Pieces of broken bottles as well
A bucket of water dispels the rays

Of the sun
A bird in flight heightens the color
Of the sky

Sometimes in a slight haze
It is the long hoot of a boat
By the river bank
Which leads to a cascade of
Throbbing sounds
Of drums and gongs
While a whirlwind spreads
Between old stands
In tall grass

Sometimes
When whistling
Spreads over the railway station
Large gracious shapes
Illuminate the streets
The trees
Sing their praises
On the site of festivities
And in the beautiful gardens
These large shapes
In colored fabric laced with pearls
Carry within them
Bewitching rhythms

Sometimes
While the cock’s crow
At dawn announces
A ladder on a gate
Blood spatter
On walls
Make words and shapes
Intervene in tumultuous homes

At home moments
Violent clanking of metal objects
Reverberate to the point of waking
Animals in their holes

Sometimes
When the sun reaches
Beneath a misty layer
Plants grow
At the doorstep of a house
A sensitive mind
Observes time
And enjoys playing
With the texture of old objects
Which he collects
He infuses into these accumulated objects
Entrancing rhythms
With his hands
Flowers form patterns
On stands

Blood drips on stones
Above car hoods
The sound of streams
And the buzzing of bees
Vibrates to the gathering of branches
In the middle of gravel

Hervé Yamguen, Douala, June 1, 2022

English translation by Dzekashu MacViban

 

»Die Vibration der Dinge« oder »Über Verbundenheit«

Elke aus dem Moore, Direktorin der Akademie Schloss Solitude, wurde eingeladen die 15. Ausgabe der Triennale Kleinplastik Fellbach zu kuratieren. Die Themen der Ausstellung »Die Vibration der Dinge« und der Rahmenveranstaltungen sind die »Schwingungen« von Objekten, ihre Besitzverhältnisse und das Thema Restitution, sowie die Verbundenheit aller lebendigen Wesen untereinander und mit den Dingen, die sie umgeben. Zentral für »Die Vibration der Dinge« ist die Wertschätzung der Natur und unterschiedlicher Wissenssysteme, insbesondere den indigenen Kosmologien, sowie die Präsentation multi-generationeller Positionen. Die diesjährige Triennale zeigte skulpturale Arbeiten eines vielfältigen Netzwerks an Künstler*innen unterschiedlicher Herkunft, zudem auch das Netzwerk der Akademie Schloss Solitude zählt.

Elke aus dem Moore im Gespräch mit Sarie Nijboer

 

Sarie Nijboer: Wie ist das Konzept der »Vibration der Dinge« entstanden und welche Ansätze waren für dich bei der Entwicklung der Triennale wichtig?

Elke aus dem Moore: Als ich 2020 die Einladung erhielt, die 15. Triennale Kleinplastik Fellbach zu kuratieren, hatte ich bereits im ersten Moment erste Ideen. Einige zentrale künstlerische Positionen der Triennale, ich nenne sie die »Ahninnen«, sind verstorbene Künstlerinnen, die ich als Referenzpunkte verstehe, so beispielsweise Annette Wehrmann mit ihren Fußbällen aus Ziegel und Zement, über die man zu Beginn der Ausstellung »stolpert«: ein initiierter Vorgang der Irritation, eine Einladung zum Sich-Vergewissern, dass nicht alles so ist, wie man denkt oder erwartet. Die Fußbälle sind nicht leicht, sie lassen sich nicht bewegen oder nur schwerlich damit spielen.[1]

Da ich meine kuratorische und auch institutionelle Arbeit immer in einem Kontext sehe – sei es im lokalen, internationalen, wie auch im jeweils institutionellen Kontext – und aus einer gemeinschaftlichen Idee heraus entwickle, war mir sehr schnell klar, dass ich diese Triennale gern im Gespräch mit drei Künstler*innen entwickeln werde, nämlich Antje Majewski, Gabriel Rossell Santillán und Memory Biwa. Mit ihnen verbinden mich teils sehr lange Arbeits- und Freundschaftsverbindungen. Wir begannen recht früh in regelmäßigen Gesprächen über Zoom, das Thema der Triennale herauszuarbeiten.

Relativ schnell ergaben sich drei thematische Stränge, die in unseren Gesprächen immer wieder auftauchten. In den ersten Überlegungen kamen wir rasch an den Punkt, dass Objekte eine Schwingung oder energetische Ladung besitzen, die durch die Intention und Bedeutsamkeit für den Menschen entstehen.  Einer der weiteren Grundgedanken, der uns beschäftigte, war die grundsätzliche Frage nach Eigentum an Lebendigem: Wie kommen wir Menschen zu der Überzeugung, dass wir etwas Lebendiges wie Pflanzen, Menschen und Tiere besitzen können? Dementsprechend präsent ist das Thema Restitution oder die Frage, was mit Objekten geschieht, die aus einer gewaltvollen Erfahrung migriert sind und gewaltvoll in einen anderen Kontext platziert wurden. Der dritte Erzählstrang handelt von der Verbundenheit aller lebendigen Wesen in dieser Welt. Das ist ein großes Thema, das in den indigenen Kosmologien seinen Bezug findet. Einige indigene künstlerische Positionen sind in der Triennale vertreten.

»Das westliche Denken ist recht eindimensional in seiner rationalen, bzw. kognitiven Prägung und lässt viele verschiedene Formen der Wissensproduktion aus.«

Sarie Nijboer: Sowohl in deiner Arbeit am Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen (ifa) als auch bei Contemporary& oder der Akademie Schloss Solitude hast du dich immer auf diesen transkulturellen Austausch und nicht-westliche Perspektiven konzentriert. Was ist dir an diesen Themen so wichtig?

Elke aus dem Moore: Das westliche Denken ist recht eindimensional in seiner rationalen, bzw. kognitiven Prägung und lässt viele verschiedene Formen der Wissensproduktion aus. Die beanspruchte Dominanz dieses Denkens, das mit der Aufklärung begann sich als universal zu verstehen, ging oft mit einem Machtanspruch und Gewalt einher. Indigene Episteme und Wissenskonzepte wurden versucht auszulöschen. Durch diese Eindimensionalität hat der Westen sich recht eingeengt und isoliert. Als Teil einer planetarischen Gemeinschaft ist es grundlegend wichtig, unterschiedliche Wissenssysteme zu reflektieren und anzuerkennen.

Viele »Vereinbarungen« der sogenannten Zivilisation, die in der Zeit der Aufklärung manifest wurden, haben bis heute ihre Wirksamkeit. Diese »Missverständnisse« gilt es zu erkennen und zu benennen, etwa das Recht auf Eigentum des Menschen an Lebendigem entbehrt jeglicher Grundlage. Ökonomin Dr. Irene Schöne bezeichnet es als »reine Fiktion«. In der Ausstellung der Triennale und den Veranstaltungen, sowie im Katalog widmen wir uns diesen »Missverständnissen«.

Sarie Nijboer: Wie hat das Netzwerk der Akademie Schloss Solitude dazu beigetragen, Kunstwerke für die Triennale zu entdecken und das Thema der »Vibration der Dinge« zu bereichern?

Elke aus dem Moore: Die Akademie Schloss Solitude hat in den mehr als 30 Jahren ihres Bestehens mehr als 1.600 Stipendiat*innen empfangen, einschließlich der Web Residencies. Ich hatte und habe immer wieder wunderbare Begegnungen mit Künstler*innen und Wissenschaftler*innen und lerne dabei sehr viel. Fast ein Drittel der künstlerischen Positionen der Triennale stammt aus dem Solitude-Netzwerk, viele aus dem Netzwerk des Programms Digital Solitude.

Ein Teil der Ausstellung findet in einem digitalen Ausstellungsraum statt. Viele der jungen Künstler*innen begreifen Kleinplastik oder Skulpturales Arbeiten nicht ausschließlich als analogen Prozess mit und am Material, sondern fassen skulpturale Plastizität heute weiter und denken Skulpturen mit Hilfe von Algorithmen und Künstlicher Intelligenz. [2]

Im digitalen Teil der Triennale zeigen wir Arbeiten von ehemaligen Stipendiat*innen oder Gästen der Akademie wie Mitra Wakil und Fabian Hesse, Jan Nikolai Nelles, Nora Al-Badri, Mary Maggic, Tiare Ribeaux, Mohsen Hazrati, Nkhensani Mkhani. Einige künstlerische Arbeiten bieten einen neuen Erfahrungswert an und ermächtigen zum eigenen Einsatz der Skulptur im jeweils eigenen Kontext. Beispielsweise die Figur der Nkisi von Nkhensani Mkhari, diese aus der Bantu-Religion stammende Figur, die Mkhari digital oder als 3D-Druck Figur nutzt, um in einer veränderten Wirklichkeit oder »augmented reality«, da einzusetzen, wo sie erforderlich ist, z.B. zur Verbesserung einer negativen Situation. Eine neue Generation von Künstler*innen beginnen, Aspekte von »Heilung« in ihren Arbeiten aufzunehmen. Viele junge Künstler*innen sind sich bewusst, dass die letzten Generationen der Menschheit den Planeten Erde sehr beschädigt und teilweise ruiniert haben und dass dieses Handeln auf kolonialem Denken basiert. Ihre Arbeiten bleiben nicht in der Kritik und Analyse stecken, sondern offerieren neue Entwürfe und Handlungsanweisungen.

Sarie Nijboer: Über das Solitude Netzwerk bist du ebenfalls auf die Künstlerin Nijolé Šivickas gestoßen…

Elke aus dem Moore: Die Stipendiat*innen der Akademie Schloss Solitude sind während ihres Aufenthaltes eingeladen, ihre Arbeitsweisen und –kontexte vorzustellen. Maria Cecilia Reyes, eine junge Wissenschaftlerin aus Kolumbien, zeigte in ihrer Präsentation als Stipendiatin der Akademie einen Film, den sie als Ko-Autorin über Nijolė Šivickas, einer litauisch-kolumbianischen Künstlerin, mitverantwortet. Meine Begeisterung für diese künstlerische Position, die ich bisher nicht kannte, ist so groß, dass ich gemeinsam mit Maria Cecilia daran ging, einige der Skulpturalen Arbeiten des umfangreichen Oeuvres der verstorbenen Künstlerin an der Triennale zu zeigen. Während dieses Prozesses hat Maria Cecilia herausgefunden, dass Nijolé Ende der 40er Jahre an der Kunstakademie Stuttgart studiert und in Fellbach gewohnt hat. Erstmals in Deutschland sind ihre künstlerischen Arbeiten auf der Triennale Kleinplastik Fellbach zu sehen. In einer parallelen Ausstellung an der Städtischen Galerie Fellbach zeigten wir auch ihre Zeichnungen, weitere Skulpturen und den Film über diese faszinierende Künstlerin.

Sarie Nijboer: Das zeigt auch, dass Kunstwerke nach dem Tod ihres Erschaffens weiterwirken oder die Absicht des*r Künstler*in weitergegeben wird. Das habe ich auch so in den Objekten von Annette Wehrmann oder Irma Hünerfauth erfahren.

Elke aus dem Moore: Ja, das ist richtig. Die »westliche« Betrachtungsweise von Form, Komposition, Farbe, Materialität, sind nicht die einzigen Parameter von Kunst und ihrer Wirkung. Eine kritische und holistische Art der Auseinandersetzung sehen wir zum Beispiel in den Arbeiten von Gabriel Rossell Santillán, oder auch in der von Memory Biwa kuratierten Sektion mit namibischen und südafrikanischen Künstler*innen, wo es um das Thema »Soundings« geht, also auch konkret darum, was klingt, was vibriert, was schwingt im Raum, welche Resonanz wird erzeugt?

Gabriel Rossell Santillán geht es um eine Transformation kulturellen Wissens. Er hat die indigenen mexikanischen Wixárika-Schamanen (Mara’akate), mit denen er seit vielen Jahren teilweise zusammenlebt, nach Berlin eingeladen, um Objekte, die im ethnologischen Museum in Dahlem in Berlin lagern, zu befragen und zu untersuchen, welchen energetischen Status sie haben. Es stellte sich heraus, dass ein Großteil der Objekte »tot« ist, und keinerlei Energie mehr aufweisen. Die Objekte wurden teilweise mit Arsen behandelt, um sie zu konservieren, und liegen nun seit vielen Jahrzehnten in Archivboxen. Einige von ihnen sind in falschen Konstellationen aufbewahrt, was große störende Auswirkungen auf das Zusammenleben, auf die Ökonomie und Ökologie der Wixárikas hat. Das Video von Gabriel in der Triennale thematisiert diese Umstände und die noch immer großen Widerstände der Museen, einen Umgang mit den Objekten zu finden, die das Wissen und die Bedürfnisse der indigenen Gemeinschaften respektiert und miteinschließt. 

Sarie Nijboer: In deinem Einführungstext des Katalogs schreibst du: »Ein neues – auf altem Wissen basierendes radikales Umdenken ist notwendig, was die Natur als Ausgangspunkt nimmt, was die lebendigen Kräfte von Materie anerkennt und die Dinge als beseelt betrachtet.« [3] So hat Antje Majewski für die Triennale, die Natur selbst zum Ausstellungsort gemacht. Sie hat in Fellbach ein Stück Wald gefunden und dort eine Gruppe von Skulpturen aufgestellt, die zu einer Art Wächtergruppe für diesen Wald werden. Es war für mich etwas ganz Besonderes, dass wir als Teil der Eröffnungszeremonie mit allen Besucher*innen den Ausstellungsteil im Wald besucht haben. Es wurde dabei sehr deutlich, dass wir dort nur Gäste sind.

Wir sind Teil der Natur, das ist einfach wichtig anzuerkennen. Und so findet auch ein Teil der Ausstellung in einem Waldstück statt. Die hölzernen Skulpturen fungieren als Schutzgeister für den Wald und sollen ihn vor dem Zugriff der Menschen beschützen. Dieses Waldstück wird nun für 100 Jahre nicht mehr von Menschen betreten werden können, ein Wunsch, den Antje Majewski für diese Arbeit zur Voraussetzung gemacht hat. Antje

Majewski hat in ihrer Arbeit Sculpture Forest Sanctuary weitere Künstler*innen eingeladen, ihre Skulpturen in dem Waldstück und als Duplikate in der Alten Kelter zu zeigen.

Sarie Nijboer: Daneben gibt es in der Ausstellung auch einen leeren Raum. Dieser Raum ist aufgrund seiner Position sehr dominant und nimmt viel Platz in Anspruch. Was war die Idee, diesen Raum in die Ausstellung einzubeziehen?

Elke aus dem Moore: In dem kuratorischen Prozess war für mich sehr zentral, einen leeren Raum in der Mitte anzubieten, um den Besucher*innen mit ihren eigenen Erfahrungen und ihren eigenen Perspektiven Raum zu lassen. Diane Hillebrand hat das auf Nachhaltigkeit basierende Ausstellungsdesign entworfen und die Idee der Resonanz aufgegriffen und im Ausstellungsraum Stühle zum Ausruhen und Innehalten platziert. Dieser leere Raum war im Laufe der Triennale Ort für sehr intensive Gespräche der Besuchenden.

Sarie Nijboer: Die Triennale hat ein Gespräch über die Bedeutung unserer Interaktion mit der Natur und anderen Lebensformen eröffnet. Was wünscht du dir für die Zukunft, um diese Ansätze zu ändern und neue Wege der Interaktion zu finden?

Elke aus dem Moore: »Transformation« war das zentrale Thema des 30-jährigen Jubiläums der Akademie Schloss Solitude im Jahr 2020. In einer gleichnamigen Vortragsreihe waren internationale Philosoph*innen, Denker*innen und Künstler*innen eingeladen über die wichtigsten Themen in dieser Zeit des Wandels zu reflektieren. Heute ist die Dringlichkeit der Themen wie die notwendige Aufarbeitung des Kolonialismus und seiner Strukturen, die uns bis heute beeinflussen, sichtbar. Viele Grundannahmen und »Missverständnisse« sind erkannt und können somit auch verändert werden. Zentral bleibt die Frage, wie wir einen respektvollen Umgang mit der Natur wieder herstellen können und uns als Teil der Natur wahrnehmen können? Und wie können wir Beziehungen aufbauen, global, institutionell, ökonomisch, die auf Vertrauen und Respekt basieren? Polaritäten gilt es abzubauen und dagegen zu wirken, und neue Formen des Miteinander zu entwickeln.  Wir sind derzeit an einem Scheidepunkt, einem evolutionären Schritt, der uns dazu einlädt nicht mehr in Dualitäten und im Getrenntsein zu verharren. Hervé Yamguen zeigt dies in seinen Bronzeskulpturen, die in der Triennale zu sehen sind, in denen Mensch, Tier und Pflanze eins sind. Er hat uns mit den »En des matins ensoleillés« ein wunderbares Gedicht geschenkt:

On sunny mornings

Sometimes
From the shelter of a tree
On sunny mornings
I beam
As my gaze falls upon
A yellow flower
Or on a pile of dead leaves

Sometimes
While walking in the forest
I come across a piece
Of wood worn by time
And I humbly place my hands
On the rough surface
I feel the result of years
On the shape of the wood
And thus the wood speaks to me
My hands respond
Sometimes

In the midst of a pile of concrete
And scrap
And cigarette butts
And plastic waste
Taking up space
And rendering the sky grey
The houses covered in
Layers of dust
And cars’ exhaust smoke
Grow old with time

Sometimes
In the yard of a house
A sun’s ray lands
On a stone or on children’s toys
And the truth becomes tangible
A nail finds its way in fabric
Pieces of broken bottles as well
A bucket of water dispels the rays

Of the sun
A bird in flight heightens the color
Of the sky

Sometimes in a slight haze
It is the long hoot of a boat
By the river bank
Which leads to a cascade of
Throbbing sounds
Of drums and gongs
While a whirlwind spreads
Between old stands
In tall grass

Sometimes
When whistling
Spreads over the railway station
Large gracious shapes
Illuminate the streets
The trees
Sing their praises
On the site of festivities
And in the beautiful gardens
These large shapes
In colored fabric laced with pearls
Carry within them
Bewitching rhythms

Sometimes
While the cock’s crow
At dawn announces
A ladder on a gate
Blood spatter
On walls
Make words and shapes
Intervene in tumultuous homes

At home moments
Violent clanking of metal objects
Reverberate to the point of waking
Animals in their holes

Sometimes
When the sun reaches
Beneath a misty layer
Plants grow
At the doorstep of a house
A sensitive mind
Observes time
And enjoys playing
With the texture of old objects
Which he collects
He infuses into these accumulated objects
Entrancing rhythms
With his hands
Flowers form patterns
On stands

Blood drips on stones
Above car hoods
The sound of streams
And the buzzing of bees
Vibrates to the gathering of branches
In the middle of gravel

Hervé Yamguen, Douala, June 1, 2022

English translation by Dzekashu MacViban

[1] Mit dem Übergang dieser Arbeit von Annette Wehrmann in den Besitz der Hamburger Kunsthalle kommt hinzu, dass die Arbeiten nur noch unter konservatorischen Bedingungen gezeigt werden können, und damit nicht berührbar sind. Annette Wehrmann hat 1991 in einer Performance versucht, mit diesen Bällen tatsächlich Fussball zu spielen. Davon existieren noch Videos.
[2] Siehe auch Beitrag von Mara Johanna Kölmel im Katalog der 15. Triennale Kleinplastik Fellbach, Die Vibration der Dinge, herausgegeben anläßlich der 15. Triennale für Kleinplastik Fellbach, Archive Books, 2022.
[3] Elke aus dem Moore im Einführungstext des Katalogs Die Vibration der Dinge, herausgegeben anläßlich der 15. Triennale für Kleinplastik Fellbach, Archive Books, 2022.

  1. With the transfer of this work by Annette Wehrmann to the possession of the Hamburger Kunsthalle, it should be noted that the works can now only be shown under conservational conditions, and thus cannot be touched. In 1991, Annette Wehrmann tried to actually play football with these balls in a performance. Videos of this still exist.

  2. See also the contribution by Mara Johanna Kölmel in the catalogue of the 15th edition of the Fellbach Small Sculpture Triennial, Die Vibration der Dinge (The Vibration of Things), published on the occasion of the same by Archive Books, 2022.

  3. Elke aus dem Moore in the introductory text of the catalogue Die Vibration der Dinge (The Vibration of Things), published on the occasion of the 15th edition of the Fellbach Small Sculpture Triennial, Archive Books, 2022.

Beteiligte Person(en)